9 CPI: Social Networks, Interviews & More

Wednesday’s practicum student interviews went incredibly well.  Woot.  Now . . . next steps.

Take the information from the interviews and create profile pages for your social network.  I suggest using Pages or Comic Life to create a template for your social network.  On Pages, use the “text box” feature to create your layout.  Be certain to set them as floating and also to turn off the text wrapping function.   That way you can move them anywhere on the page.

After creating your template, create a profile page for each of your interview subjects.

Remember, as we are doing this work you are demonstrating your understanding of STEAL characterization techniques and the importance of adopting someone else’ point-of-view.  Get inside your interview subject’s head and create that profile page as though you were that person.

Between now and next class, you must interview three people you see often, but do not know.  These may be community members, school staff or faculty members, or students.  Use the interview form that Ms. Murphy developed.  You will be creating profile pages for these folks next class, so make sure you have that information ready to go.

H/W:

Three interviews using the STEAL interview graphic organizer.  – Due next class

Social Network Profile Pages for Practicums – Due next Class (Choose one of your interview subjects)

Social Network Profile Pages for People You See Everyday- Due NEXT Thursday

Flocabulary #2: Shakespeare is Hip Hop – Due Monday 5/20

9 CPI: Social Network Mock Interviews, Characterization, Point of View

Today we continue working on our new social networks and doing the work necessary toward building profiles using our crazy strong knowledge of characterization, point of view and social media.

Everything starts with Flocabulary SAT #2: Shakespeare Is Hip-Hop.  There will be a quiz and exercises on this list due on Monday, May 20.  And remember, you can re-take #1 if you demonstrate/document some studying, some practicing.

From there, you will conduct some mock interviews courtesy Ms. Murphy and the colleagues she has lined up to help.  Follow her directions throughout this experience.  You will benefit from taking it seriously as this is giving you the practice you before doing your actual interviews.

You should use this STEAL graphic organizer to help you in the interview.  You need to turn it in at the end of class.

After conducting the mock interviews, start constructing a profile page for your social network using Pages or Google Drive.  Fill that profile page with the information from your interviewee.  Someone in each class offered to make a template for everyone to use.  Hopefully those templates are ready to go.  If not, create your own.

On Friday, we will spend more time with profiles and prepare for the work you need to do between Friday and next Tuesday.

 

9 CPI: Social Networks, Characterization, Point of View & More

Today we start designing a better social network and doing the pre-planning we need to do in order to create that network.

Screen shot 2013-05-06 at 10.32.02 AM

We’ll start by watching these three clips from The Social Network.  After watching each clip, identify what you can learn about the protagonist, Mark Zuckerberg as played by Jesse Eisenberg, and which characterization techniques (STEAL) the filmmaker uses to deliver that information about the character.  You might want to blog these understandings for quick reference.

After this, we will brainstorm all of the social media networks that we know.   You can find reminders, inspirations and piles of information here: http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/55-interesting-social-media-infographics/

This leads to us working in small groups to design our ideal social network tools.    We will share these ideas and come up with common denominators a.k.a. the parts and pieces we can all agree should be part of our social network.

Now . . . all of this is leading toward the following work: interviews and profile building.

Here’s the one characteristic of our social network that will make it unique: users don’t create their own profiles; the network creates it for them.  What?!!?  Yes.  I’ll explain . . .

You will be interviewing people you see everyday, but do not know.  They can come from three categories: students, teachers/staff, community members.  For example, you might buy a soda from the same store at the same time everyday, but not know the name of that person behind the counter.  You might sit in a learning lab with a teacher you know nothing about.  You might eat lunch at a table next to a group of juniors you don’t know — and sit there every day.

You will be interviewing them and using that information you learn about them to create their profile for our new social network.  After you create the profile, you will meet with them again to see how well you did with your information and design work.

The point of it all? To use your STEAL knowledge and combine it with your P.O.V. knowledge to create profiles that you can feel confident accurately represent these people or “characters” you have just come to know because you have been able to adopt their points of view.

Some of the essential questions you may be answering: How do we get to know a person through social media?  What makes a social network successful and powerful?  What can we gain from better knowing the people around us?

On Wednesday, we will practice our interview skills as we know we need to go out into the world and do this for real.

This video should help us with that.

H/W:

1. Prepare questions to ask the interview subjects about the various information your class chooses to have in its social network.  Check your e-mail for your class list of topics.

2. Tolerance Projects, Self-Assessments: PAST DUE! Get ’em in.

3. New Flocabulary list is coming on Monday.  Make sure you have done the work for Flocabulary list #1!!!!

4. Blog, blog, blog!  Remember, 3 per week.  Lots of topics available to you right now.  Use it to plan your interview, your network, talk about the power of the internet, etc.